1. Are these experiences, as Stone would have it, love? The tech world generally measures how much you like a service by how much time you spend on it. So a lot of time equals love. My own intuition is that this is not love. It’s something much more technologically specific that MIT anthropologist Natasha Schüll calls “the machine zone.”
  2. In the Victorian era, telegraph operators were the first people to live with virtual reality. (via collision detection: “Wired Love”: A tale of catfishing, OK Cupid, and sexting … from 1880)

    In the Victorian era, telegraph operators were the first people to live with virtual reality. (via collision detection: “Wired Love”: A tale of catfishing, OK Cupid, and sexting … from 1880)

  3. Google+: Circles Love Story (by Google)

    It’s interesting to see Google make an ad like this.

    Does technology influence how relationships develop? I think the obvious answer is that does, at least somehow. But to what degree? Does it radically change development? In what ways does it augment processes that are already there? In what way does it slow them?

  4. “Here’s the good news: parents won’t have to worry about a pregnancy scare through Skype,” said Josh Shipp, the author of “The Teen’s Guide to World Domination,” who is considered an authority on teenage behavior. “But how young people control their feelings of love, or what is more commonly infatuation, is a concern to me because now it can lead to non-stop texting and Skyping, and become all-consuming.” (via Skype Postpones Sweet Sorrow - NYTimes.com)

    “Here’s the good news: parents won’t have to worry about a pregnancy scare through Skype,” said Josh Shipp, the author of “The Teen’s Guide to World Domination,” who is considered an authority on teenage behavior. “But how young people control their feelings of love, or what is more commonly infatuation, is a concern to me because now it can lead to non-stop texting and Skyping, and become all-consuming.”

    (via Skype Postpones Sweet Sorrow - NYTimes.com)

  5. A recent experiment that I carried out using neuroimaging technology suggests that drug-related terms like “addiction” and “fix” aren’t as scientifically accurate as a word we use to describe our most cherished personal relationships. That word is “love.”