1. Startup Sherpa Bets Its Predictive Smartphone Assistant Can Best Google Now | MIT Technology Review

    Predictive News?

    The more I read about Google Now and Sherpa, the more I can’t help but think about how the same predictive intelligence for news apps would be so effective. If done right, it could fill many “jobs to be done.”

    A smart, predictive news app would be a step above my “OpenMoment” idea/desire, which outlines a mobile app that sorts news by real-life context. Rather than have to select “morning commute” and filter news that fits your preferences for a long Metro ride — like I thought by itself would be pretty cool — smart technology could use your location and time data to automatically suggest news material your most likely to read and enjoy.

    It could do that for a commute, a lunch line, the “lean back” hours of the evening, etc., always suggesting the most appropriate content for each context. I’d sign up right away. It’d save me some time and potentially lend itself to discovery I may have missed out on. 

    I know some people are experimenting with this realm of mobile location + news (Kon*Fab comes to mind). Perhaps experimentation will become easier as Google Now and Sherpa get going and we’ll be able to see some news outlets get into the game, too.

    Location and time data spliced together could offer pathways to answering big relevancy questions in media (in the information overload we all recognize, how do we serve stories or information readers will want to see). And I’m sure there are a hefty plenty of possibilities for targeted advertising based on both location and time of day… 

  2. (via Pair Is A Path For The Two Of Us | TechCrunch)
I generally support tech and services that aim to improve upon conditions people find themselves in socially. Skype, for instance, seems like a great thing when used to conduct a meeting with someone far away, or to communicate with a loved one equally far away. Pair is interesting to me largely because it seems like a scrolling scrapbook of things and services that already exist. And that’s intriguing for a few reasons. I see benefits in that collection of ways to communicate — it’s nice to keep everything together, that’s why scrapbooks exist, and a searchable one is just dandy — but I also wonder about the effects of enclosing all your communication in one app. It seems like there would be some “thing” that changes when your messaging with your significant other doesn’t appear side by side with a text from, say, your college roommate who left his ID somewhere and needs to get back into your dorm.I don’t know if that “separation” — and more so, “isolation” — is inherently good or bad. (It may just be different.) But it does definitely make me wonder about how it changes the fabric of a relationship. 
I may be extra curious because of my current research, but what role would that “isolation” of instant communication tech play in the development and maintenance of a romantic relationship? Does it in any way speed it up? Or slow it down?Curious. 

    (via Pair Is A Path For The Two Of Us | TechCrunch)

    I generally support tech and services that aim to improve upon conditions people find themselves in socially. Skype, for instance, seems like a great thing when used to conduct a meeting with someone far away, or to communicate with a loved one equally far away. 

    Pair is interesting to me largely because it seems like a scrolling scrapbook of things and services that already exist. And that’s intriguing for a few reasons. I see benefits in that collection of ways to communicate — it’s nice to keep everything together, that’s why scrapbooks exist, and a searchable one is just dandy — but I also wonder about the effects of enclosing all your communication in one app. It seems like there would be some “thing” that changes when your messaging with your significant other doesn’t appear side by side with a text from, say, your college roommate who left his ID somewhere and needs to get back into your dorm.

    I don’t know if that “separation” — and more so, “isolation” — is inherently good or bad. (It may just be different.) But it does definitely make me wonder about how it changes the fabric of a relationship. 

    I may be extra curious because of my current research, but what role would that “isolation” of instant communication tech play in the development and maintenance of a romantic relationship? Does it in any way speed it up? Or slow it down?

    Curious. 

  3. (image via NPD group posted in Wired article "How Smartphones are Changing Photography: The Numbers Are In")
NPD found that “…smartphones accounted for 27 percent of photos shot this year — last year, the number was 17 percent. Accordingly, photos shot with dedicated cameras dropped from 52 to 44 percent.”

    (image via NPD group posted in Wired article "How Smartphones are Changing Photography: The Numbers Are In")

    NPD found that “…smartphones accounted for 27 percent of photos shot this year — last year, the number was 17 percent. Accordingly, photos shot with dedicated cameras dropped from 52 to 44 percent.”

  4. (via How Cellphones Shape the Lives of College Students [INFOGRAPHIC])
  5. (via Internet of things will have 24 billion devices by 2020 — Cloud Computing News)As seen by one trade group.